Tag Archives: Manchester Ancient Egypt Society

MAES Lecture 14/4/14: Prof. Rosalie David – The Priests of Ancient Egypt

BM EA 65443. Statue of a priest.

BM EA 65443. Statue of a priest.

The next Manchester Ancient Egypt Society Bob Partridge Memorial Lecture will be given by Prof. Rosalie David

The Priests of Ancient Egypt, Practioners of Magic and Medicine

Monday 14th April, 7:30pm
Days Inn, Sackville Street, Manchester, M1 3AL
All welcome

 

The priesthood dominated and permeated almost every aspect of ancient Egyptian society, and yet there have been very few studies of their impact on this civilisation.

Professor David is currently undertaking a detailed study of the priesthood and the contribution it made to life in Egypt, and this lecture will explore one important aspect of the work – how the priests functioned for over three thousand years as the main practitioners of medicine and magic.

It will reveal how biomedical studies on human remains and the literary sources relating to the priesthood and medical treatment are helping to augment our knowledge of this very important group in Egyptian society.

Professor Rosalie David, OBE, PhD, FRSA, is Emeritus Professor of Egyptology at The University of Manchester and until her retirement in 2012, she was Director of the KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology at The University of Manchester. She was formerly Keeper of Egyptology at the Manchester Museum.

She is the author of over 30 books and many articles and was awarded the OBE for services to Egyptology.

 

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MAES lecture 09/09/13: ‘Experimental Mummification’ by Ryan Metcalfe

Gilded Roman mummy mask from Hawara. Acc. No, 2179. Photo: Paul Cliff

Gilded Roman mummy mask from Hawara. Acc. No, 2179. Photo: Paul Cliff

The next Manchester Ancient Egypt Society lecture will be given by Dr. Ryan Metcalfe

Experimental Mummification

Monday 9th September, 7:30pm
Days Inn, Sackville Street, Manchester, M1 3AL
All welcome

Despite being a source of fascination and scientific investigation for well over a century, the methods used by the ancient Egyptians to mummify their dead are still not fully understood. The effects of the process on chemical analysis are also rather obscure, but the range of materials used in mummification may have a significant impact. A large number of experimental models have been produced over the years. Although these have tended to look at the overall success of the methods under investigation, the last few years have seen a small number of studies focussing on the chemical and biochemical effects of Egyptian mummification. This talk will present the most recent experiments undertaken at Manchester.

Ryan Metcalfe spent over 12 years in the KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology, working up from MSc student to Lecturer. Coming from a background in the sciences rather than Egyptology, his research has concentrated on the use of chemical and biological analysis and in particular how mummification affects our ability to work with ancient human remains.

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MAES Lecture 12 November 2012 – ‘A Page from the Book of Genesis': Changing visions of the Fayum Landscape

A lecture by Dr. Claire Malleson at Manchester Ancient Egypt Society

Monday 12th November, 7:30pm

Days Inn, Sackville Street, Manchester, M1 3AL

‘A Page from the Book of Genesis': Changing visions of the Fayum Landscape

Representing different things to different people, the Fayum region can be viewed as the land of the Labyrinth and the Lake, a rich fertile oasis, the home of some of the most important Middle Kingdom remains, and a focus of interest regarding the changing environment in Egypt. This lecture will present some of the very different perceptions of the Fayum, from Ancient Egypt, classical Greece and Rome, Medieval Islamic scholars and early European travellers. It will examine who influenced who, and how literary trends and story-telling played a critical role in shaping our ideas as well as tracking some of the perceptions of the region which have remained the same throughout history.

Having studied Egyptology at Birkbeck College and Bloomsbury Summer Schools in London Claire started her MA (part time) in Liverpool in 2002, graduating in 2004, the topic of her thesis being Investigating Ancient Egyptian Towns: a Case Study of Itj-tawy. She began her PhD (part-time) at Liverpool in 2005 and started working on sites in Egypt, training as an archaeobotanist with Dr Murry at Giza (Mark Lehner’s site), going on to work as a botanist at other sites in Egypt. She completed her PhD in 2012, her thesis titled ‘Imagined and Experienced: Changing Perceptions of the Fayum Landscape.’ As well as Giza, she has worked at the archaeological sites of Tell el-Retaba, Medinet Gurob, Sais, Tell Mutubis, Tell el-Borg, Zawiyet Umm el-Rakham and, in the UK, Sedgeford in Norfolk and Chester Roman Amphitheatre.

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MAES Lecture: ‘Felines, Facts and Fantasies: The Role of Cats in Ancient Egypt Society’

Coffin for a cat (Acc. no. 9703)

- A lecture by Joyce Filer

Manchester Ancient Egypt Society

Monday 8th October, 7:30pm

Manchester Ancient Egypt Society

Days Inn, Sackville Street, Manchester, M1 3AL

The talk will look at the large and varies sources of evidence for cats (both large and small) in the Egyptian arena.  We shall examine the ancient Egyptian attitude towards these creatures from  the extremes of hunting and killing to worshipping and domesticating … and more!  The talk will be illustrated by tomb scenes, artifactual exhibits and radiological images.  Following a career in audiology and Deaf education Joyce studied Egyptology at University College, London.  She then undertook postgraduate work in ancient pathology and forensic work and was Curator for Human & Animal Remains in the Dept. of Ancient Egypt & Sudan for twelve years.  She now undertakes a wide range of freelance projects including: archaeological excavation, publishing, CT scanning and lecturing.

Following a career in audiology and Deaf education Joyce studied Egyptology at University College, London.  She then undertook postgraduate work in ancient pathology and forensic work and was Curator for Human & Animal Remains in the Dept. of Ancient Egypt & Sudan for twelve years.  She now undertakes a wide range of freelance projects including: archaeological excavation, publishing, CT scanning and lecturing.

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