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Egypt in World War I: Manchester Histories Festival

WW1-Edfu.jpgTo commemorate the WW1 Centenary, researchers from Cardiff University will hold a ‘roadshow’ at the Museum on Saturday 11th June exploring local links between Manchester regiments serving in Egypt and the Middle East and collecting memories. Items from the Manchester Museum archive relating to the Great War will be on display, with short tours by the Curator of Egyptology.

The team hope that visitors will bring photographs, postcards, stereoviews, lantern-slides, or any other items relating to wartime spent in Egypt and Palestine along to find out more about how they fit into a wider picture. Once loaded to the website copies of images will be available for all to see and so give a more comprehensive view of the First World War in Egypt than is presently available.

Please bring along any photographs etc. for the team to re-photograph or scan for uploading to the website – they are not looking to keep any original material, everything will be rendered virtually.

Planes

Views of an Antique Land – Imaging Egypt and Palestine in the First World War

Much of the commemoration of the First World War has focussed on the Western Front and so gives the impression that the war was entirely one of mud and trenches with very little movement. However, the war in Egypt and Palestine was much more mobile and often fast moving. It is a surprise to many that a great number of personnel served in Egypt and Palestine at some point during the war with units regularly being withdrawn from the Western Front to serve in the area before returning to Europe.  A new project offers a different perspective on the First World War using images taken in Egypt and Palestine during the period of the conflict.

Leading the project from Cardiff University are Dr Steve Mills and Professor Paul Nicholson of the School of History, Archaeology and Religion supported by project officer Hilary Rees.  The project, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, focusses on collecting and making accessible images of Egypt and Palestine as they would have been seen by people during the First World War.  To this end we are collecting not only military images but also those of the ancient monuments of Egypt and Palestine which have much to tell us about the presentation of archaeological sites at that time.

The aim is to collect photographs taken by service personnel, postcards, lantern slides and stereo-views. The project does not collect the actual views but rather scans of them which will be uploaded to a dedicated interactive website where anyone interested in seeing what their ancestors saw or who is interested in how the ancient monuments, cities, towns and villages looked during the First World War can get that information.

 

The website at http://sites.cardiff.ac.uk/ww1imagesegypt/ will be a perpetual online learning resource and archive offering new views of archaeological sites, military installations and cities as they appeared during the war.

 

The participation of members of the public at all stages of the project is very welcome. It is hoped that they will contribute by uploading relevant images and information to the site and in identifying images.  The project team can be contacted directly at ww1imagesegypt@cardiff.ac.uk

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Gifts for the Gods travels north of the border

Ancient Egyptian Animal Bio Bank

We always knew that the six months during which Gifts for the Gods was open at Manchester Museum would be a very different time for us. Having a successful exhibition based on our current research open on campus, meant that we had many demands on our time – including public engagement events, learning programmes and community outreach initiatives. All of these events are vital in helping to publicise the research which underpins the exhibition, raise the profile of what we do and enthuse the public about the mummies themselves. Now the numbers have been counted, we know that 1011 school children have taken part in guided learning sessions and organised workshops around animal mummies (and many more school groups who used the exhibition space for self-guided learning activities). To date, an amazing 9655 visitors engaged with events linked to the themes of the exhibition.

It was lovely (and quite emotional!) to…

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by | May 10, 2016 · 9:20 pm

Because that’s how we (wrap and) roll!

Ancient Egyptian Animal Bio Bank

On Thursday 25th February, a momentous event took place at Manchester Museum. Crowds gathered to witness a theatrical spectacle; this time it wasn’t a mummy ‘unwrapping’, but a mummy ‘re-wrapping’. Over 400 people attended the event and a further 1000 engaged via the internet with the help of the live-streaming app, Periscope. The event was a bold move; there was no guarantee that the re-wrapping would be a success. After all, our practice efforts had been less than encouraging! Nonetheless, we decided to take the bold move to forge onwards and take our research at the University of Manchester out of the laboratory and into the public spotlight.

Fig 100 copy

Time had not been on our side in the run up to the event, with many other commitments meaning that we had just one afternoon to practice what we hoped to achieve on the night. We have studied many mummies over the…

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by | March 23, 2016 · 11:21 pm

Experiential Mummification #1

Hot new experimental animal mummification research

Animal Mummy Lab

As part of our research for The Leverhulme Trust, the BioBank Team have mummified several bird cadavers using experiential methods seen in the ancient mummies (Fig. 1) (kindly provided by the Natural History Museum Bird group, Tring and productive household pet hunting activity). The use of simple observation and clinical imaging were used to monitor smell, weight loss and temperature/humidity, level of desiccation and preservation, and difficulty in the mummification technique; all of which particularly relate to EM1 and EM10.

Experimental Mummies Figure 1: Wrapped Experimental Animal Mummies

Our experiences with clinical imaging have shown that they can be limited when it comes to collating zooarchaeological data (species identification, Minimum Number of Individuals, age and sex) from animal mummies that contain something other than a single, complete individual. To assess this difficulty, the NHM, Tring donated 6 bags of bird remains for mummification; the caveat being that they did not tell us how many or what species were present…

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by | March 16, 2016 · 4:08 pm

Who’s coming to a mummy ‘re-rolling’?

We will stage an animal mummy re-rolling, LIVE!

Ancient Egyptian Animal Bio Bank

Mummy unwrapping ‘spectacles’ were a popular pastime in the nineteenth century with mummies brought back from Egypt as souvenirs by travellers providing the majority of the candidates. These events were as much a spectacle, a Victorian socialite pastime, but as time wore on, the studies became increasingly linked to the people behind the mummies and the science behind the embalming process.

On June 10th, 1850, Lord Londesborough issued a now infamous invitation to witness the ‘unrolling’ of a human mummy from Thebes ‘at half past two’. A spectacle which was to take place at his home, in the comfort of his drawing room, no doubt with a glass of claret in hand. This invitation epitomises an ‘un-rolling’ event. Delving into the bandages, cutting through the layers of linen, to reveal the person within. Yet the vast majority of Lord Londesborough’s invitees were members of the Royal Society of Antiquaries, a…

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Talk Like an Egyptian – English Corner at Manchester Museum Tuesday 2 Feb

Museum Meets

Join us at Manchester Museum for English Corner on Tuesday 2 February at 1pm for free English conversation class.

The theme is Egyptian amulets.

English Corner also takes place in Manchester Art Gallery and Whitworth Art Gallery.

The February dates are:

Daytime sessions

Tuesday 2 Feb 1-2.30 at Manchester Museum, Oxford Road, M13 9PL
Wednesday 10 Feb 1-2.30 at Manchester Art Gallery, Mosley Street, M2 3JL
Friday 26 Feb 10.30-12 at The Whitworth Art Gallery, Oxford Rd, M15 6ER

Evening Sessions

Thursday 18 Feb 6.30-8 p.m at Manchester Art Gallery, Mosley Street, M2 3JL

English Corner runs every month on the first Tuesday, second Wednesday, third Thursday and fourth Friday. You are welcome to attend as many sessions as you can.

What is English Corner?

English Corner uses art and objects to help people practise English.

Practise your English speaking and listening skills. It’s a free English conversation class for…

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MAES Lecture 14/12/15 – Roger Forshaw ‘The Saite Revival: Resurgence of Egypt’s Power’

Hor statue

Saite statue of Hor. Acc. no 3570 © Paul Cliff

The next Manchester Ancient Egypt Society lecture will be given by Dr Roger Forshaw (University of Manchester)

The Saite Revival: Resurgence of Egypt’s Power

Monday 14th December, 7:30pm
Pendulum Hotel, Sackville Street, Manchester, M1 3AL
All welcome

 

Following the turmoil and political fragmentation of the Third Intermediate Period, a family of rulers from Sais in the Delta, in an extraordinary story of adroit diplomacy and military activity, reunited Egypt into a single state. For nearly a hundred and forty years Egypt was once again ranked as a major power and under Saite rule Egypt entered a period of economic prosperity and cultural revival.
Roger Forshaw, a retired dental surgeon, studied Egyptology at Manchester University and is now a research associate at the KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology.

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